After the sixties catapulted a variety of different cultures into the sphere of consumer conscious, the market was primed for interior designer’s Vicente Wolf’s particular blend of heritage and contemporary design. Originally categorized as “High-Tech” due the perceived novelty of his slick interiors, the classification feels slightly misleading in this day and age, when the term connotes the increasingly rapid integration of technology with our daily lifestyle. Today, it would be more accurate to say that Wolf’s particular brand of minimalism reads cosmopolitan due to his characteristic juxtaposition of materials, cultures, and eras of the furniture he both designs and sources.
Read more at Knoll Inspiration.

After the sixties catapulted a variety of different cultures into the sphere of consumer conscious, the market was primed for interior designer’s Vicente Wolf’s particular blend of heritage and contemporary design. Originally categorized as “High-Tech” due the perceived novelty of his slick interiors, the classification feels slightly misleading in this day and age, when the term connotes the increasingly rapid integration of technology with our daily lifestyle. Today, it would be more accurate to say that Wolf’s particular brand of minimalism reads cosmopolitan due to his characteristic juxtaposition of materials, cultures, and eras of the furniture he both designs and sources.

Read more at Knoll Inspiration.

At turns modern and airy, comfortable and warm, this renovated 1980’s house is a testament to colorful personalities of its inhabitants. Populated with pieces by Warren Platner, Eero Saarinen, Jens Risom, and Florence Knoll, the home’s interior is artfully punctuated with pattern, personal treasures, and stuffed animals that make the home feel delightfully chic.

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